Posts Tagged ‘River Rafting’

Orange River Canoe Safari, Namibia – Sept & Oct 2014

Orange River canoe safaris are synonymous with bright blue skies, bright sunshine and mesmerising scenery.

Orange River canoe safaris boast deep blue skies, rugged landscapes and mesmerising scenery.

September kicked off with a four-day canoe adventure on the Orange River with my MBA classmates. Beginning its 2000km+ journey in the Drakensberg Highlands of Lesotho, the Orange – recently renamed the Gariep – River is South Africa’s foremost waterway. In its lower reaches, the Orange traces the South Africa-Namibia border and our multi-day camp-out canoe safari focused on the stretch of water snaking through the heart of the Ai-Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park .

Sjambok Rapid action

A canoe aces the infamous Sjambok Rapid

Felix Unite (www.felixunite.com) – leaders in multi-day Orange River canoe safaris – put together our guided and fully catered trip: a stunning excursion deep inside the ruggedly beautiful Richtersveld and a much-needed escape from the GSB classroom! Drifting along the languid river, we passed through a geological wonderland of contorted red rock canyons. However, the episodic appearance of rocky rapids ensured we kept our paddles and life jackets close at hand, and it wasn’t long before the notorious Sjambok Rapid took its toll on our flotilla of glass-fibre boats. Only five of twelve canoes made it through unscathed, while everyone else enjoyed some mandatory ‘bonus’ swim time! The next hour was spent bailing out boats, collecting equipment bobbing in the eddies below the rapid and drying everything out.

Witches Mountain

Witches Hat Mountain in the Richtersveld

Having been fortunate enough to tackle the Orange on numerous previous occasions, I’ve also had the opportunity to write and publish a couple of magazine features on these popular and highly rewarding canoe safaris over the years…

http://www.stevecunliffe.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Travel-Namibia-Orange-River-Safari-Final.pdf

http://www.stevecunliffe.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Explore-Namibia-Gariep-River-Canoeing.pdf

Regardless of how many times I get to experience this magical river, I never tire of spending quality time on the Orange. I would classify the rapids as ‘fluffy’ rather than terrifying, but it is – in my humble opinion – the extreme arid beauty and mesmerising star-strewn night skies that make this canoe safari so enjoyable and utterly addictive. Check out www.felixunite.com/river_trips/orange_river for further details or to make a booking.

The sensational arid wilderness settings for a memorable overnight camp

A sensational riverside setting ensures another memorable overnight camp alongside the Orange

 

Celebrating after Cape Town Ultra

Celebrating after the Cape Town Ultra

Despite the fairly heavy workload involved with finishing off my MBA, I still managed to find a smidgen of spare time to hit the Table Mountain trails. The highlight being taking part in the inaugural Cape Town Ultra Trail Run (www.ultratrailcapetown.com). Tackling the full ultra was way beyond my current levels of fitness and training, so I opted instead for the short course route above the City Bowl. Starting from the city centre, we initially ran through the Company Gardens and Greenmarket Square before ascending through Bo-Kaap to traverse the length of Signal Hill, circling around Lions Head and then up onto the lower contour of Table Mountain before a final bone-jarring descent back into the City Bowl. Surprising even myself, I somehow managed to clinch a rather flattering 7th place on this hybrid 20km urban-trail run!

West Coast sunset

West Coast sunset

September and October also necessitated a final big push with my thesis in order to overcome the final MBA hurdle. My topic involved conducting an actor network analysis of the various social and environmental networks operating in the Bergrivier Municipality (www.bergmun.org.za). The research portion of the study demanded I take regular data collection excursions up the West Coast. On one of these occasions I was fortunate to be accompanied by my wife and young son for a couple of days in Velddrif (www.velddriftourism.co.za).

With a stunning seaside location overlooking Laaiplek Beach, Sunset Villas (www.velddriftourism.co.za/content/sunset-villas) boasts ocean-view sunsets of the highest order. Our unit comprised two en-suite bedrooms, an open plan living room, dining room and kitchenette, as well as a balcony with braai and five-star sea view.

Late October also saw the long-awaited publication of the final instalment of the Central Kalahari adventure that I shared with my brother-in-law in Botswana late last year.  If you haven’t read our tale of breaking down deep within the CKGR with only lions and Cape cobras for company, then you can access the SA 4×4 feature covering this epic adventure here: http://www.stevecunliffe.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/SA-4×4-CKGR-Cover-Feature-Proof.pdf

We had the West Coast's Laaiplek Beach all to ourselves when visiting Velddrif

We had the West Coast’s Laaiplek Beach all to ourselves when visiting Velddrif

Khaudum, Sisheke and Zambezi Whitewater, Namibia & Zambia – Aug 2012

Spotted hyaena feed on a kudu carcass while thousands of flamingoes look on at Nyae Nyae Pan

After a thoroughly enjoyable summer holiday in the USA, August was devoted to a long-awaited and much anticipated JavZam work trip to explore the Sisheke District in the northern sector of the KAZA TFCA (http://www.kavangozambezi.org/).

I departed Cape Town with three work colleagues on a drizzly winter’s morning for Namibia; first stop was seldom-visited Khaudum (http://www.met.gov.na/Documents/Khaudum%20National%20Park.pdf) in northeast Namibia. This arid park falls within the KAZA TFCA and is quite possibly Namibia’s wildest national park. Elephants are dime a dozen here and anyone with a soft spot for these giant pachyderms should make sure a trip to Khaudum features prominently on their safari bucket list.

Khaudum is wild tract of arid Namibian wilderness where elephant herds outnumber tourists 10:1

After 5 days exploring the wilds of Khaudum and its neighbouring flamingo-rich Nyae-Nyae Pans, we reluctantly bid farewell to the elephant herds and made our way through the Caprivi to try out the new Sioma Border Post north of Kongola.  A fancy new road terminated in the middle of nowhere and we were forced to backtrack 17km to find the Namibian ‘immigration table’ perched under a shady tree!  In contrast the Zambian side had some very fancy new immigration offices, but no road yet!  All this made for a great adventure as we eventually figured everything out.  Later, we learned that we were the first visitors to use this new KAZA tourist facility, which had only officially opened 5 weeks earlier.

The primary reason for our trip was to conduct a thorough reconnaissance of the Sisheke District and Sioma Ngwezi National Park as these areas make up the core area for the exciting and ambitious Sisheke Conservation Project (http://www.sisheke.com/).

An inquisitive wild dog at Katuli Pools on the edge of Sioma Ngwezi NP

For the next two weeks we drove, boated and flew through out the 3,000,000ha Sisheke Conservation Area that was recently awarded to JavZam to manage and develop on behalf of the Barotse Royal Establishment for the benefit of the local people and wildlife alike.

In amongst clocking up many miles investigating this massive tract of wilderness, we also managed to catch a few tiger fish and find a pack of 16 wild dogs!  Sadly, we also saw the unsustainable practices of escalating elephant poaching, widespread logging and uncontrolled burning at every turn. The area has incredible potential but huge challenges as well.

After a couple of weeks deep in the bush, we headed for a well-earned break in Livingstone where the folks at Safari Par Excellence (http://www.safpar.com/) treated us to a great day of world-class whitewater on the mighty Zambezi.  After an adrenalin-charged morning of river boarding where it was hard not to feel like crocodile bait, we abandoned our little body boards in favour of a more sociable self-bailing raft for the afternoon session.  The rapid-infested Zambezi is a very special river and it’s hard to imagine there’s any better way to spend an action-packed day in the wilds of Africa.

Tackling the wet and wild Class V whitewater with SAFPAR on the mighty Zambezi River in Zambia

The Karnali River, Bardia NP and Everest, Nepal – May 2011

Like a fine red wine Nepal just gets better and better the longer we spend savouring this impressive country!  It is certainly proving to be an incredible and varied little Himalayan kingdom and the prefect playground for a couple of outdoor lovers and adventure sport aficionados.

After a gruelling two-day bus ride west, we reached the end of the road at Sauli Bazaar on the banks of Nepal’s biggest river – The Karnali.  We were part of a ten-man crew (including two ladies!) for a week-long river trip with Equator Expeditions (http://www.equatorexpeditionsnepal.com/).  It turned out to be a fun group and we had endless laughs on the raft as we skirted some big rapids and camped on sandy beaches next to the river.  Sleeping around a campfire under the star-studded heavens was a definite highlight for both of us.

The expedition ended at Chisopani on the boundary of Royal Bardia National Park and after a week on the river the comfort that awaited us at Tiger Tops’ Karnali Lodge was just what the doctor had ordered.  We soaked up the luxury, devoured great food and thrived off the quality wildlife experiences.  I was desperate to catch a glimpse of my first Indian one-horned rhino, so to end up having numerous close up sightings of five different rhinos feeding and swimming was very very special indeed.  Crouching in a bush watching a seven month old calf suckling from its mother while I was on a walking safari was the ultimate high of our wildlife-viewing extravaganza.  We topped the safari off with two tiger sighting – a young female with a hog deer kill and a handsome male escaping the pre-monsoon heat by sleeping in a pool of water.  What a great place Bardia turned out to be!

After a couple of days recuperating in Kathmandu we boarded a plane for Lukla and the start of our two-week Everest trek.  We chose a circuitous route to base camp via the sacred emerald green lakes of the Gokyo valley and over the Cho La pass to Gorakshep and Everest Base Camp. The weather gods smiled on us and we were treated to some idyllic weather for the epic Himalayan views from the summits of Gokyo Ri (5357m) and Kala Pattar (5545m).  Sitting on the top of these rocky vantage points gave us ringside seats to a jaw-dropping wraparound vista that defied belief … a host of snow-covered 8,000m+ peaks (Cho Oyu, Everest, Lhotse, Nuptse, etc) rubbed shoulders and seemed almost close enough to touch.  These scenes of raw beauty exuded an overwhelming sense of mother nature’s awesome power.

After living in India for three years and enjoying nine weeks adventuring through Nepal, the Tenzing Hillary Everest Marathon (http://www.everestmarathon.com/) proved the genuine grand finale to our time in Asia.  It was with a combination of great excitement and a little trepidation that I approached the start of the race.  The 29th dawned grey and cold.  Mist swirled through Everest base camp (5360m) and thick grey clouds hung ominously overhead.  When I cracked the ice off my tent zips, I was greeted by a white world of snow and ice.  When the start gun fired at 7am the temperature was well below freezing and the unrelenting snow refused to let up until we were 16km into the race!  The start took place inside the infamous Khumbu Icefall and after jumping a small crevasse we ran over the frozen rocks and ice of the glacial moraine for 8km while my lungs continuously screamed for more oxygen.  My plan was simple – and borne of necessity – run everything that is flat or downhill but walk/climb the hills.  As we slowly descended towards the half-way mark at Dingboche the conditions improved and I found it a little easier to breathe.  Reaching the half-way stage in 3h10, I truly believed a six-hour finish was on the cards, but two viciously steep hills between the 32 and 37 kilometre marks killed that idea and in the end I was more than happy to finish in 6h34, which put me in a respectable 6th position out of 68 international participants.

With the tiny Himalayan nation of Nepal wowing us in so many ways, the final chapter in our Asian sojourn has proved to be an absolute cracker!

The adventures for June appear to be somewhat tamer … our next stop is London to visit my sisters and then it’s onto Iceland and USA.  The journey continues and we’re loving the ride…

Subansiri, Varanasi and the Andamans, India – December 2010

Without doubt this has been my best month in India to date!

December kicked off with an epic 10-day descent of the Subansiri River.  Snaking its way through the rugged wilderness of Arunachal in the remote northeast, the Subansiri is arguably Asia’s ultimate river journey.  With idyllic weather, exhilarating white-water and picture-perfect beach campsites nestled under star-studded skies, it was a rafting adventure to savour.  The Aquaterra (www.aquaterra.in) trip afforded an incredible opportunity to paddle through wild jungle-clad valleys devoid of people: a rare privilege in India.  I feel incredibly lucky to have been one of the fortunate few to experience this rare and unique Indian wilderness.  In April 2014, this amazing river trip, along with 38 000 square kilometres of pristine jungle, will be lost forever when the new Hydel hydroelectric dam on the Lower Subansiri is flooded.

With the arrival of our first Christmas visitors, we headed off to Varanasi to share an authentic Indian cultural experience with Katherine’s family ahead of two weeks in the Andaman Islands.  Varanasi was a pleasant surprise to me and, although I feel its claim of being ‘the Venice of India’ is dubious at best, we did spend a thoroughly enjoyable long weekend in the holy city.  We boated along the Ganga at dawn spellbound by the scenes unfolding all around us.  From the wood pyres of the busy crematoriums with gangs of stray dogs chewing bones to the swimming Ghats and evening religious ceremonies, exploring Varanasi proved a lively, invigorating and eye-opening experience.

Between Varanasi and the Andamans, I squeezed in a work assignment to Hyderabad to document a CRS-sponsored project rescuing and reintegrating woman who had been trafficked into sexual slavery.  These brave ladies shared their harrowing tales with me recounting the unthinkable abuses they’d suffered after being enslaved as sex workers before eventually escaping or being rescued.  It was a sobering experience that stood in stark contrast to our family excursion to Agra and the Taj Mahal the following day.

The month culminated with an epic two-week trip to the Andaman Islands over Christmas and New Year.  The Andamans were nothing short of superb.  The laidback island lifestyle couldn’t have been further removed from the frenetic pace of mainland India.  We alternated our days between scuba diving and chilling on ‘the best beach in Asia’ (according to Time magazine) with body surfing, biking and beach bats to keep us suitably entertained.  Every evening we feasted on platters of delicious fresh seafood and cold beer.  However, the unanimous highlight of our time in the Andamans was chartering our own boat for a four-day excursion to explore little-visited Long Island and its surrounding waters. Lalaji Beach and diving on Campbell Shoals were the ultimate highlights of this great island adventure.

Returning to work in cold, foggy Delhi on January, 7th was a real shock to the system.

CWG, Kali-Sarda & Bandhavgarh’s Tigers, India – October 2010

October proved to be a great month in India!  After an incredibly wet monsoon, the rain eventually abated, the humidity disappeared and the weather became tolerable once more.  The changing seasons signalled that it was time to start travelling again and, hopefully, enjoy some fun-filled adventures along the way.

The month kicked off with a visit from an old Welsh friend, Huw Roberts, and his Australian girlfriend, Celi.  Their stay happened to coincide with the much-maligned Commonwealth Games taking place in Delhi, so we decided to brave the terrible traffic, collapsing pedestrian bridges, high security and a dengue fever outbreak, and headed to the main stadium to watch the Athletics finals.  It was without doubt the most spectator-unfriendly event I’ve ever experienced, highlighted by the fact that the stands were, at best, only 15% full for the men’s and woman’s 100 metre finals.  What a pity, especially for the athletes.

I decided to escape the rest of the CWG carnage in the capital and joined Aquaterra Adventures (www.treknraft.com) for a weeklong expedition down India’s most under-rated Himalayan river.  The Kali-Sarda traces India’s international border with Nepal as it snakes its way through deep valleys and a pristine wilderness dominated by wildlife, warm water, enjoyable rapids, idyllic weather and picture-perfect riverside beaches for camping.  Twice, when we beached our rafts and kayaks for the night, we found fresh leopard tracks criss-crossing the beach we were about to sleep on!  It was an action-packed and highly entertaining week on the water and I succeeded in collecting some great photographic material, as well as cool experiences on the ‘ducky’ (an inflatable kayak), for my book India Whitewater.

After a frenetic week back in Delhi processing photos and chasing magazine deadlines, it was time for the highlight of the month… A stay at the Taj Safaris luxury lodges of Pashan Garh and Marua Kothi courtesy of AndBeyond India (www.andbeyondindia.com).  After spending a day marvelling at the spectacular and erotically sculpted temples of Khajuraho, we headed to Pashan Garh: an ultra-luxurious bush retreat on the outskirts of Panna National Park.  Panna was a true wilderness experience and, with almost no other vehicles in the reserve, our enthusiastic naturalist guide, Dipu, shared the park’s secrets with us.  On top of some great wildlife viewing, quality birding, boating on the crocodile-infested Ken River and soaking up the beautiful mountain scenery, he also managed to track down a staggering four leopards during our 3-day visit!

From Panna we drove four hours across Madhya Pradesh to reach Marua Kothi, situated a stone’s throw from India’s premier tiger reserve.  Bandhavgarh was the antithesis of Panna.  Peace and solitude went out the window the second we entered the fray in the revered Tala tourism area.  This is India’s most famous tiger-viewing zone, renowned for having the highest density of relaxed tigers in all of Asia.  The frantic nature of the tiger search took some getting used to, but in the end Yugdeep tracked down a couple of the iconic cats for us.  We enjoyed an especially memorable sighting of a 4.5 year old male silently stalking cheetal (spotted deer) right past our vehicle.  When the spotted deer eluded him, the King of the Jungle proceeded to roar: an unbelievable sound that capped off the quintessential Bandhavgarh sighting.

The action looks set to continue throughout November with trips to Jaisalmer in Rajasthan, Amritsar in the Punjab, and a photographic assignment to Manipur in the remote northeast of India all on the cards during the upcoming month.  To top it all off, Katherine and I will be tackling the Delhi half-marathon on the 21st of November!

Ranthambhore and the Ganga, India – March 2010

March delivered some spectacular wildlife viewing during two separate trips to Ranthambhore National Park in Rajasthan. Asia’s iconic cats treated me to a couple of superb sightings early in the month.  The first was a 2.5 hour sighting of a big male tiger on a territorial patrol through zone 4 of the park.  After marking his territory, he stopped to rest and scared some spotted deer half to death when they unknowingly grazed a little to close to him.  After taking an hours ‘cat nap’, he headed off again in search of some Sambar deer near one of the perennial waterholes.  Unfortunately, a setting sun robbed us of the chance to see him in action as he slowly stalked towards the unsuspecting deer.

A few days later, on a morning excursion in picturesque zone 3 of the park, I experienced my best game drive in India to date.  A well known tigress T17 (AKA ‘The Lady of the Lake’) was hunting and we were fortunate enough to witness her multiple attempts and stalking manoeuvres before she got lucky.

Fortune favoured us as we sat watching a herd of spotted deer grazing the green grass along the shore of Raj Bagh Lake.  A cacophony of tiger-induced distress erupted from the deer as the feline burst out of the forest at full tilt. However, somehow the chital managed to evade her best efforts and escaped. The tigress turned and retreated into the ruins of an old hunting palace before emerging out the other side to cross a thin strip of land cutting through the middle of the lake.  It was a spectacular sight to see her crossing shortly after sunrise with her reflection mirrored in the glassy lake.  After stopping for a noisy drink and rest in the water, she detoured to Padam Talau Lake where she spotted another unwary herd of spotted deer grazing along the lake shore. She bided her time until two rutting males engaged each other in a fight, then she charged.  Bursting out of the aptly named ‘tiger grass’ she was at full speed by the time the chital became aware of her.  The distracted male deer never stood a chance.  She barreled into one of them knocking him down and going straight for the throat.  Five minutes later his legs stopped flaying and peace once again descended on the scene as the tigress retreated back into the grass with her prize to feed.  What a sighting…

After enjoying such superb tiger sightings I doubted that anything could eclipse these great experiences.  However, as we raced for the gate one evening a pair of mating leopards tried their best to steal the honours for ‘the most spectacular sighting of the trip’.  Later in the month we spent over an hour with a big male leopard in zone 1 as he tried to escape the incessant alarm calls of some perplexed langur monkeys and sambar deer that shadowed his every move.  He was a brute of a leopard with a huge dew lap hanging from his neck and he walked with the swagger of a cat that knows he owns the place!

It wasn’t only tigers and leopards that entertained me royally while I explored Ranthambhore.  Khem Villas provided a luxurious and friendly base offering a pristine nature experience on the fringe of the park.  Extremely friendly staff, delicious food, beautiful cottages overlooking small lakes with a rich birdlife kept Katherine and me suitably entertained outside of game drive hours.  This lodge comes highly recommended for anyone fortunate enough to visit Rajasthan’s most famous wildlife sanctuary. Those with budgetary constraints should opt for the Ranthambhore Bagh, which is a great mid-range option.  Dicky Singh is the owner and a keen wildlife photographer.  His excellent images adorn the walls of the hotel ensuring that you will ‘see’ plenty of tigers as you dine!

I managed to fit in one more trip up to the Ganges River before the rafting season draws to a close next month.  A friend, Rory Pryde, was visiting from Australia and he joined Katherine, me and a couple of Delhi mates for a fun weekend of wild white-water just outside of Rishikesh.  The weekend culminated with us running The Wall – a grade 4+ rapid – in a little two-man inflatable ‘ducky’.  We surfed a big hole towards the end of a long stretch of white-water before getting cleaned up and washing out the bottom of the rapid.  Rory’s saucer-sized eyes greeted me when I popped up downstream and, after we realised we had survived, it was high fives all around!

As I look ahead to April, Katherine and I will be heading home for 5 weeks of ‘home leave’ to enjoy the ‘wedding season’ in South Africa.  My sister gets married over the Easter weekend, then a good University friend, Garth Kingwill, gets married the following weekend in Mozambique and, finally, Katherine and I will be having a South African wedding celebration for all our friends and family that couldn’t make it over to Minnesota last year.  So next month will see us enjoying a change of scenery back in Africa and a much-anticipated holiday back home to catch up with friends and family.  Watch this space for further details on this next adventure…

Jodhpur, Corbett and the Ganga, India – February 2010

I spent the first half of February in Delhi catching up on a backlog of work and chasing multiple article deadlines.  Katherine and I did manage to take a long weekend over Valentines Day and escaped to Jodhpur in Rajasthan.  It was our first visit to Blue City and we deliberately coincided our trip with the opening of our good friend Dickie McCallum’s latest Flying Fox zip line tour.  The Flying Fox course in Jodhpur took us on an epic flight over the battlements of Mehrangarh Fort as we clipped onto six separate cables for an aerial view of the fort that is hard to beat.  What a great experience!

The end of February saw me travel up to Corbett National Park on behalf of Leisure Hotels.  I spent a fantastic week staying in their Corbett Hideaway and Hideaway River Lodges in the Himalayan foothills.  The River Lodge is the only camp to be situated inside the park with an enviable location on the picturesque Ramganga River in the reserve’s northern zone; it was a real treat to spend 5 days in this wilderness paradise.  Although I was up there to collect material for Leisure Hotels’ promotional photo essays, I had plenty of fun and great game viewing in the process.  Wild elephants strolling across the grassy plains, a rare leopard cat feeding on a Langur monkey and a beautiful tigress on the hunt one evening where especially memorable sightings, especially when the tiger started growlling at some Sambar deer that where sounding the alarm and warning other animals of her presence!  Corbett is a stunningly beautiful reserve and the wildlife viewing is definitely under-rated.  I hope to return again next season to stay in some of the old colonial Forest Rest Houses inside the park’s wildlife-rich Dikala tourism zone.

Next stop on my Leisure Hotels itinerary was Lahore House in Haridwar to briefly experience the ceremonies and festivities of the sacred hindu pilgrimage known as Kumbh Mela.  Millions of devoted hindus undertake this pilgrimage (that comes to Haridwar only every 12 years) and bathe in the holy waters of the Ganga River.  It was quite an experience to witness the religious fervor of this grand event which includes the meditions and rituals of naked Naga Babas. However, photography was a challenge as my trip coincided with  Holi – the festival of colour – and all the coloured dyes and water bombs didn’t agree with my cameras, not to mention the cultural challenges of photographing people at religious events.

The final stop on my trip was Leisure Hotel’s Camp Five Elements on the Ganges River.  This beautiful beach camp provided me with the ideal base from which to experience and photograph the white-water action of the mighty Ganga.  Just north of Rishikesh lies the epicentre of India’s white-water and adventure sports industry.  There are base camps strung out along both sides of the river with well over a hundred companies operating on this short stretch of river, although Camp Five Elements and Himalayan River Runners definitely lay claim to the two finest beaches on the whole river.  I spent three days paddling down the river and setting up next to the biggest rapids and shooting the action as a procession of rafts and kayaks tackled the white-water. Notorious rapids like The Wall, Three Blind Mice, Golf Course and Club House provided the best opportunities for getting the money shots with the low water levels at this time of year.

As I look ahead to March I have some more great adventures lined up with two visits to Ranthambhore National Park in search of tigers and other Asiatic wildlife, as well as a return trip to the Ganga for more white-water entertainment.  An action-packed and exciting month lies in wait… Bring it on!

Return top